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Welcome  aboard award winning "Nautical Talk Radio," the number one nautical radio program that takes you around the nautical world in 60 minutes. Every week, listeners get a smell of the salt air and a taste of the sea, as we feature the latest nautical news, sea stories, fish tales, marine environmental issues, Coast Guard activities, maritime history, and local waterfront events.

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Captain Lou's Nautical News Headlines

Captain Lou's Latest Nautical News 1/14/18

FORE RIVER BRIDGE TO OPEN ON DEMAND DURING RUSH HOURS
Effective immediately, Coast Guard Captain Claudia Gelzer, the commander of Sector Boston and Captain of the Port of the Boston has authorized the Weymouth - Quincy Fore River Bridge to open to tankers and barges during weekday rush hours to facilitate the delivery of critical fuel. The bridge openings will happen on an as-needed basis, which may impact vehicular traffic on the bridge. Normally on weekdays, the Fore River Bridge is closed between 6:30 and 9 a.m. and between 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., but the recent cold spell and ice have made it difficult for the tankers and barges to deliver heating oil and kerosene to fuel power plants and public transit vehicles. More than 85% of the nationís home heating oil needs are in the northeastern U.S., and 90% of that fuel will be delivered, at some point, by barges.

COMMUTER BOAT SERVICE IN HINGHAM IS BACK
Commuter boat service between Hingham and Boston should resume tomorrow morning. MBTA GM Luis Manuel RamŪrez announced last week that service from the Hingham Intermodal Center at the former Hingham shipyard will restart on the morning of Martin Luther King Day. The ferry service was temporarily suspended due to ice damage to the dock. The entire dock system had to be rebuilt two feet forward because of the damaged piles which were cut off and partially removed. The service between Hull and Boston had remained in operation.

NOAA GOES AFTER THE CODFATHER
NOAA Fisheries is seeking a million dollars in civil penalties in association with the crimes that Carlos Rafael, the codfather has pleaded guilty to and is sitting in jail for the next 45 months. The federal government is also trying to prevent the convicted fishing magnate from ever getting back into the seafood business. They want a court order that will deny any future applications by Rafael for any permit issued by the agency. NOAA also hopes to revoke the seafood dealer permit issued to Carlos Seafood and his 38 commercial fishing permits. NOAA also filed a charging document against two of Rafael's scallop boat captains and 28 businesses connected to Rafael.

NOAA APPOINTS NEW NORTHEAST REGIONAL ADMINISTRATOR
NOAA Fisheries announced that Michael Pentony will replace John Bullard as the new northeast Regional Administrator effective January 22nd. His office will be in Gloucester. Pentony has been with NOAA since 2002, serving in a series of positions including as the Assistant Regional Administrator for the Sustainable Fisheries Division since 2014. Before that, he worked for five years as a policy analyst for the New England Fishery Management Council, primarily on issues related to habitat, marine protected areas, and the deep-sea red crab fishery. He has a Bachelor of Science in Engineering from Duke University and a Masterís of Environmental Management degree from the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University. In his new role, Pentony will assume responsibility for managing fisheries in approximately 100,000 square miles of the Northwest Atlantic. He will also be responsible for the large marine ecosystem from Maine to Cape Hatteras and the Great Lakes. To do that, his office will work closely with two fishery management councils, the different states, the fishing industry, and other stakeholders. As Administrator, he will also oversee critical aspects of international fisheries conservation and management in the region.

TOTOABA BASS POACHERS SHOOT DOWN SEA SHEPHERDíS DRONE
The Sea Shepherd ocean conservation group, made famous in the TV show Whale Wars, is now trying to stop poachers in the Gulf of California off Mexico from killing the critically endangered vaquita porpoise and totoaba bass. The Sea Shepherders said they were shocked that while their drone observed the poachers working at night, their drone was shot down. The poachers kill the totoaba fish for their swim bladders. Much like shark fins, the bladders are sought for their alleged medicinal powers and sold on black markets in China and Hong Kong for tens of thousands of dollars. The poachers set gillnets to catch the totoaba, but the nets catch everything in their path, including the most endangered marine mammal in the world - the vaquita porpoise. Thirteen gunshots were fired at the drone making use of automatic weapons to a new level of violence. Sea Shepherd president and founder Captain Paul Watson has always maintained that the camera is the organizationís greatest weapon.

NEW ZEALAND REFUSES TO SEND NAVY TO STOP JAPANESE WHALERS
In a related story, conservationist Peter Bethune, whose go fast wave piercing boat was run over and sank by a Japanese whaling boat, wants New Zealand to send a Navy patrol vessel to the Antarctic to stop the Japanese whaling fleet. Japan has once again sent a fleet of ships to the Southern Ocean to kill whales under the guise of conducting scientific research. Last August, because of lawsuits, Sea Shepherd announced that it would no longer send its ships to stop Japan's whaling activities. That is why Peter Bethune wants the New Zealand navy to step in. However, a statement released by New Zealand's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade said because the Japanese whaling fleet was operating in international waters, they had no legal basis to interfere with it. Instead they called for the International Whaling Commission to put pressure on the Japanese government to end the killing of the whales.

COAST GUARD NEEDS BIGGER BUDGET
Coast Guard Commandant Paul Zukunft said the hurricanes, mudslides, and ice breaking is causing huge budget problems for his agency. He fears that any new starts on new vessels will be affected. The Coast Guard is trying to stay current with the maintenance of its 60 year old ice breakers, aircraft and aging equipment, but will need a bigger budget to close out fiscal 2018 and prepare for fiscal 2019. You might recall that the Trump administration tried to cut the Coast Guard budget by $1.3 billion or 14 percent of its 2018 budget. However, that didn't happen after Trump said the Coast Guard had re-branded itself as the premier lifesaving agency.

NOAA OFFERS FREE FISHING WORKSHOPS
The Marine Resource Education Program is offering fishermen and others a workshop to learn the basics of fisheries science and how the fishery management process works. The program will provide an inside look at the fisheries science and management processes, demystify the acronyms and vocabulary, and equip fishermen with the tools to engage in shaping regulatory action and participating in collaborative science. This workshop will be held February 26-28 in New Bedford and will be moderated by members of the local fishing community. For more information call the Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

VOLVO OCEAN RACERS LEAVING DOLDRUMS
It's a tense time for the Volvo Ocean Race sailors as their torturous days in the doldrums are just about over. They are now in their 12th day of Leg 4 sailing from Melbourne to Hong Kong as now all seven teams have crossed the Equator and entered the northern hemisphere. The teams took time to induct the sailors who crossed the equator for the first time into King Neptuneís Court by shaving their heads. With just under 3,000 miles of Leg 4 still to go, they said they have plenty of time to for their hair to grow back before arriving in Hong Kong.

CONTRACTOR AT FISH MARKET STEPS ON FISH WITH HIS BOOTS
And last on today's nautical news, a lady at a fish market in New York City saw an electrician standing on the fish with his boots as he worked on a fuse box at the back of the display case. The customer recorded what she saw with her smart phone camera and can be heard asking him if he thought that fish was going to be sold. The electrician said yes after the fish were washed. She then spoke with an employee at the market who told her that the fish that were stepped on would not be sold and would be thrown out. She posted her video of the man walking on the fish on Facebook and it went viral with 35,000 people sharing it, resulting in the city sending a food safety inspector to the market. The inspector also asked about the contractor standing on the fish with his boots. Management stated that he had to stand on the fish in the ice with his boots because the boots prevented him from getting electrocuted. I wonder if he learned his lesson.



CAPT LOUíS TOP NAUTICAL NEWS STORIES IN 2017

#15 COAST GUARD CHANGING THE WAY LIGHTHOUSE SIGNALS ARE ACTIVATED
From now on, mariners go to Channel 83 on their vhf marine radio and click the microphone 5 times in rapid succession to activate fog horns at lighthouses.

#14 PROPOSED FISH FARM FOR MOON ISLAND IN BOSTON HARBOR
Massachusetts representative Bruce Ayers proposed the empty granite tanks formerly used for the sewer treatment plant on Moon Island now be utilized to farm fish.

#13 ICCAT INCREASES BLUE FIN TUNA QUOTA
The United States and other countries from around the world debated management challenges for tunas, swordfish, and sharks at the 2017 annual meeting of International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas in Marrakech, Morocco. The United States received a 17% increase in their Atlantic blue fin tuna quota and a 20% increase in their North Atlantic albacore tuna quota.

#12 COMMERCIAL FISHING TO RESUME IN UNDERWATER MONUMENT AREA
President Trump accepted Secretary of Interior Ryan Zinke's recommendation to open the national underwater monuments and seamount areas off Cape Cod to commercial fishing. The recommendation came days after the one year anniversary of President Obamaís order that created the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument and banned commercial fishing there. The monument area is more than 4,900 square miles in size and is located about 100 miles southeast of Cape Cod.

#11 THE NEW MARSHFIELD MARITIME BUILDING
Marshfield Harbormaster Mike DiMeoís number one goal since he was appointed to his position over 10 year ago was to build a new maritime center. This Christmas he got his wish. A ceremony was held Christmas week as he stood beside Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito to break ground for the center. Construction is now underway and the 2.13 million dollar complex could be open by the end of next summer.

#10 TALL SHIPS ARRIVED IN BOSTON
The tall ships returned to Boston this past June. There were seven host ports around the world for the regatta, and Boston was the only port in America. The last time a tall ships gathering of this size took place in Boston was in the year 2000, when we celebrated the new millennium.

#9 INSURANCE COMPANY CLAIMS HOLES MADE BIGGER
The story about Nathan Carmen, the young man who took his mother on a fishing trip on his boat that sank and killed his mother. The sinking occurred in September 2016 about 100 miles offshore. Nathanís mother, Linda Carman, was never found, but Nathan was rescued a week later on a life raft after his boat sank. His saga continued all through 2017 in federal court as he sued to collect insurance money for the loss of his boat. A witness for the insurance company that denied his claim testified that a power tool was used to make screw holes on the boatís transom larger and have asked a judge to declare the insurance claim on the boat invalid. In a legal document filed in US District Court by lawyers for the insurance company that insured Nathan Carmanís boat, accused him of making alterations to his boat ďwith the intentionĒ of sinking it with his mother on board. Nathan adamantly denied the allegations and no criminal charges have been filed against the young man who could inherit millions of dollars from his mother's estate.

#8 MARSHFIELD POLICE CHIEF RESCUES BOATERS
Marshfield Police Chief Phil Tavares and an assistant harbormaster jumped into a harbormaster boat after receiving a phone call that a boat was sinking with 4 people on board. He located the boat seconds before it sank and save the lives of the four.

#7 THE LOST ARGENTINIAN SUB WITH A CREW OF 44
Although several countries including the U.S. went to help search for the submarine, it was never found. Some speculate that it sank in such deep water that it in disintegrated from the pressure. Submarine expert and naval historian Paul Lawton told me that he thought at a depth of around 1000 feet was its crush level.

#6 ALL HANDS LOST ON ALASKAN CRAB BOAT
Six fishermen aboard the 92 foot crabbing vessel named Destination went down with the boat. No mayday call was ever received by the Coast Guard. Only an Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) alerted authorities of a problem when it touched the water. Upon arriving on scene, the Coast Guard found buoys, tarps, and a life-ring belonging to the fishing vessel along with a sheen of oil. Destination's home port was Seattle, Washington. It was thought that the extra weight from ice on the boat and its traps affected the boatís stability.

#5 SEARCH SUSPENDED FOR 2 NEW BEDFORD FISHERMEN Two New Bedford fishermen aboard the clam boat Misty Blue were lost at sea, after the boat sank 10 miles off the southeast corner of Nantucket. The 69 foot clam boat Misty Blueís EPIRB sent out a distress signal and another nearby clam boat rescued two of the four fishermen on board. They were brought uninjured to an approaching Coast Guard boat. The Coast Guard searched hundreds of square miles for the two Misty Blue crewmembers before suspending their search. The two missing fishermen were identified as 44 year old Michael Roberts and 32 year old Jonathan Saraiva from Fairhaven and New Bedford. Massachusetts State Police divers located the boat in 80 feet of water and eventually recovered the bodies of the two who were found inside the boat. The deaths of the crew left the fishing communities devastated, and once again proved that fishing is the most dangerous occupation in the world.

#4 COAST GUARD RESPONDS TO HURRICANES
Three major Category 4 hurricanes, Harvey, Irma, and Jose kept the Coast Guard busy and left thousands of people homeless. During just Hurricane Harvey, the Coast Guard rescued 11,022 people and 1,384 pets in Louisiana and Texas. The Coast Guardís response to Hurricane Harvey was one of the largest the organization had seen in decades. Then came Hurricanes Irma and Jose. The Coast Guard was credited with saving 60,000 lives during the three hurricanes. Popular vacation and boating islands in the Caribbean and Puerto Rico were destroyed. People in Puerto Rico will not get their electricity restored until early Spring of 2018.

#3 JOHN BULLARD ANNOUNCES RETIREMENT
NOAA Fisheries Northeast Atlantic Regional Administrator John Bullard, a former mayor of New Bedford, Massachusetts, who joined NOAA in 2012, announced he will retire on 5 January, 2018. In his position as regional administrator, Bullard worked with the New England and the Mid-Atlantic fishery management councils and the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission to manage 44 fish stocks, including the lucrative scallops and lobster fisheries. Bullard was in the center of controversial decisions imposing the quotas and emergency closures on the New England fisheries. He also pushed for electronic monitoring pilot projects on fishing vessels. When he took the job, he admitted that he knew very little about fish or fishing.

#2 COUNTING CODFISH IN GULF OF MAINE
Massachusetts fishermen claimed that the federal catch quotas devastated their cod fishery and that the governmentís surveys were flawed. Fishermen claimed the governmentís research boat didnít go to where the cod were and instead were fishing in random areas. Scientists from UMass Dartmouth said the fishermen made a valid point. A team of researchers and fishermen worked together using cameras to prove the government wrong. The cameras showed a lot of cod going into their open net. Charter boat captains said the loss of recreational fishermen coming from out of state to catch codfish had a severe effect on the local economies.

#1 CODFATHER PLEADS GUILTY TO ALL 28 CHARGES
Carlos Rafael, also known as the "Codfather" and owner of Carlos Seafoods, the largest commercial fishing business in New England, pled guilty in federal court in Boston to all 28 charges filed against him, which included falsifying fishing quotas, false labeling of fish, conspiracy, evading fishing quotas, tax evasion, and smuggling profits to Portugal. Judge William Young sentenced him to 46 months in jail and ordered him to pay a $200,000 fine. The judge banned him forever from having anything to do with commercial fishing. In a following court proceeding several boats along with the corresponding permits were seized. The feds are still deciding what to do with his remaining assets and how to distribute the permits and quotas among the fishermen.

CELEBRATING 26 YEARS ON RADIO STATION 95.9FM WATD

Listen to the live broadcast of "Nautical Talk Radio" with Capt Lou and crew, Sunday mornings from 11 - 12 noon (Boston time) on stations 95.9FM WATD and 1460AM WATD. Also streaming around the world on www.959watd.com. Listen anytime to replay of recent shows at www.NauticalTalk.com.

* Winner of Mass/Rhode Island Associated Press "BEST TALK SHOW"
* Winner of Boston's Achievement In Radio "BEST INTERVIEW" AWARD
* Recipient of American Lighthouse Foundation's "LEN HADLEY AWARD"
* Recipient of Coast Guard's Joshua James Lifesaving Medal for
public service
* Nominated Boston's A.I.R. "BEST PRODUCED PUBLIC AFFAIRS PROGRAM"
* Judge of IBEX Innovation Products
* Judge of New England Boat Show's Best Exhibitors
* Member of Boston Harbor Islands National Park Advisory Council
* Member of South Shore Harbormaster Association
* Member of Mass Marine Trades Association
* Retired Status U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
* Member of Quincy Bay Race Week Association
* Member of Mass Boating and Yacht Club Association
* Member of Stellwagen Bank Charterboat Association
* Member of Boat Writers International
* Life Member of Mass Striped Bass Association
* Life Member and Past Commodore of Metropolitan Yacht Club









 

CELEBRATING 25 YEARS ON RADIO STATION 95.9FM WATD"

Listen to the live broadcast of "Nautical Talk Radio" with Capt Lou and crew, Sunday mornings from 11 - 12 noon (Boston time) on radio station  95.9FM WATD, streaming around the world on www.959watd.com. You can also listen to a replay of recent shows anytime during the week a www.NauticalTalk.com.

* Winner of Mass/Rhode Island Associated Press "BEST TALK SHOW"
* Winner of Boston's Achievement In Radio "BEST INTERVIEW" AWARD
* Recipient of American Lighthouse Foundation's "LEN HADLEY AWARD"
* Recipient of Coast Guard's Joshua James Lifesaving Medal for public service
* Nominated Boston's A.I.R. "BEST PRODUCED PUBLIC AFFAIRS PROGRAM"
* Judge of IBEX Innovation Products
* Judge of New England Boat Show's Best Exhibitors
* Member of Boston Harbor Islands National Park Advisory Council
* Member of South Shore Harbormaster Association
* Member of Quincy Bay Race Week Association
* Member of Stellwagen Bank Charterboat Association
* Member of Boat Writers International
* Life Member of Mass Striped Bass Association
* Life Member and Past Commodore of Metropolitan Yacht Club

"CELEBRATING 25 YEARS ON RADIO STATION 95.9FM WATD"


Listen to the live broadcast of "Nautical Talk Radio" with Capt Lou and crew,  Sunday mornings from 11 - 12 noon (Boston time) on radio station 95.9FM  WATD, Marshfield, and streaming around the world on www.959watd.com. You can also listen to a replay of the most recent show anytime during the week at www.nauticaltalk.com.